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Chemical Datasheet

ALUMINUM CHLORIDE, ANHYDROUS

8 - Corrosive
Chemical Identifiers | Hazards | Response Recommendations | Physical Properties | Regulatory Information | Alternate Chemical Names

Chemical Identifiers

The Chemical Identifier fields include common identification numbers, the NFPA diamond, U.S. Department of Transportation hazard labels, and a general description of the chemical. The information in CAMEO Chemicals comes from a variety of data sources..
CAS Number UN/NA Number DOT Hazard Label USCG CHRIS Code
  • 7446-70-0
  • Corrosive
NFPA 704
Diamond Hazard Value Description
0
3 2
W
Blue Health 3 Can cause serious or permanent injury.
Red Flammability 0 Will not burn under typical fire conditions.
Yellow Instability 2 Readily undergoes violent chemical changes at elevated temperatures and pressures.
White Special W Reacts violently or explosively with water.
(NFPA, 2010)
NIOSH Pocket Guide International Chem Safety Card
none
General Description
A white to gray powder with a pungent odor. Corrosive to tissue and toxic by ingestion.

Hazards

The Hazard fields include special hazard alerts, air and water reactions, fire hazards, health hazards, a reactivity profile, and details about reactive groups assignments and potentially incompatible absorbents. The information in CAMEO Chemicals comes from a variety of data sources.
Reactivity Alerts
Air & Water Reactions
Fumes in moist air (forms a large amount of hydrogen chloride gas). Reacts with active metals in the presence of moisture to produce hydrogen and HCl gases. Based on a scenario where the chemical is spilled into an excess of water (at least 5 fold excess of water), half of the maximum theoretical yield of Hydrogen Chloride gas will be created in 0.02 minutes. Experimental details are in the following: "Development of the Table of Initial Isolation and Protective Distances for the 2008 Emergency Response Guidebook", ANL/DIS-09-2, D.F. Brown, H.M. Hartmann, W.A. Freeman, and W.D. Haney, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, June 2009.
Fire Hazard
Behavior in Fire: Reacts violently with water used in extinguishing adjacent fires (USCG, 1999)
Health Hazard
Contact with the skin or eyes in the presence of moisture causes thermal and acid burns. (USCG, 1999)
Reactivity Profile
ALUMINUM CHLORIDE behaves as an acidic salt. Self-reactive. After long storage in closed containers, explosions often occur upon opening [Chem. Abst. 41:6723d 1947]. Can cause ethylene(also other alkenes) to polymerize violently [J. Inst. Pet. 33:254 1947]. Causes ethylene oxide to rearrange and polymerize, liberating heat [J. Soc. Chem. Ind. 68:179 1949]. Can catalyze violent polymerization of allyl chloride [Ventrone 1971]. Addition to nitrobenzene containing about 5% phenol caused a violent explosion [Chem. Eng. News 31:4915 1953]. Mixtures with nitromethane may explode when organic matter is present [Chem. Eng. News 26:2257 1948].
Belongs to the Following Reactive Group(s)
Potentially Incompatible Absorbents

Use caution: Liquids with this reactive group classification have been known to react with the absorbents listed below. More info about absorbents, including situations to watch out for...

Response Recommendations

The Response Recommendation fields include isolation and evacuation distances, as well as recommendations for firefighting, non-fire response, protective clothing, and first aid. The information in CAMEO Chemicals comes from a variety of data sources.
Isolation and Evacuation
Excerpt from ERG Guide 137 [Substances - Water-Reactive - Corrosive]:

As an immediate precautionary measure, isolate spill or leak area in all directions for at least 50 meters (150 feet) for liquids and at least 25 meters (75 feet) for solids.

SPILL: See ERG Table 1 - Initial Isolation and Protective Action Distances on the UN/NA 1726 datasheet.

FIRE: If tank, rail car or tank truck is involved in a fire, ISOLATE for 800 meters (1/2 mile) in all directions; also, consider initial evacuation for 800 meters (1/2 mile) in all directions. (ERG, 2016)
Firefighting
Excerpt from ERG Guide 137 [Substances - Water-Reactive - Corrosive]:

When material is not involved in fire, do not use water on material itself.

SMALL FIRE: Dry chemical or CO2. Move containers from fire area if you can do it without risk.

LARGE FIRE: Flood fire area with large quantities of water, while knocking down vapors with water fog. If insufficient water supply: knock down vapors only.

FIRE INVOLVING TANKS OR CAR/TRAILER LOADS: Cool containers with flooding quantities of water until well after fire is out. Do not get water inside containers. Withdraw immediately in case of rising sound from venting safety devices or discoloration of tank. ALWAYS stay away from tanks engulfed in fire. (ERG, 2016)
Non-Fire Response
Excerpt from ERG Guide 137 [Substances - Water-Reactive - Corrosive]:

Fully encapsulating, vapor-protective clothing should be worn for spills and leaks with no fire. Do not touch damaged containers or spilled material unless wearing appropriate protective clothing. Stop leak if you can do it without risk. Use water spray to reduce vapors; do not put water directly on leak, spill area or inside container. Keep combustibles (wood, paper, oil, etc.) away from spilled material.

SMALL SPILL: Cover with DRY earth, DRY sand or other non-combustible material followed with plastic sheet to minimize spreading or contact with rain. Use clean, non-sparking tools to collect material and place it into loosely covered plastic containers for later disposal. Prevent entry into waterways, sewers, basements or confined areas. (ERG, 2016)
Protective Clothing
All personnel in the area should wear safety clothing, including fully closed goggles, rubber or plastic-coated gloves, rubber shoes, and coveralls of acid-resistant material. An acid-vapor canister mask should be carried in case of emergency. In certain applications, it may be advisable to wear this equipment on a routine basis. (USCG, 1999)
DuPont Tychem® Suit Fabrics
No information available.
First Aid
INGESTION: if victim is conscious have him drink water or milk. Do NOT induce vomiting.

SKIN: flush immediately with plenty of water. For eye contact, flush with water for at least 15 mins. and get medical attention immediately. (USCG, 1999)

Physical Properties

The Physical Property fields include properties such as vapor pressure and boiling point, as well as explosive limits and toxic exposure thresholds. The information in CAMEO Chemicals comes from a variety of data sources.
Chemical Formula:
  • AlCl3
Flash Point: data unavailable
Lower Explosive Limit (LEL): data unavailable
Upper Explosive Limit (UEL): data unavailable
Autoignition Temperature: Not flammable (USCG, 1999)
Melting Point: 381 ° F (USCG, 1999)
Vapor Pressure: data unavailable
Vapor Density (Relative to Air): data unavailable
Specific Gravity: 2.44 at 77 ° F (USCG, 1999)
Boiling Point: data unavailable
Molecular Weight: 133.34 (USCG, 1999)
Water Solubility: data unavailable
Ionization Potential: data unavailable
IDLH: data unavailable

AEGLs (Acute Exposure Guideline Levels)

No AEGL information available.

ERPGs (Emergency Response Planning Guidelines)

No ERPG information available.

PACs (Protective Action Criteria)

Chemical PAC-1 PAC-2 PAC-3
Aluminum chloride (7446-70-0) 30 mg/m3 60 mg/m3 360 mg/m3
(DOE, 2016)

Regulatory Information

The Regulatory Information fields include information from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Title III Consolidated List of Lists and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards (see more about these data sources).

EPA Consolidated List of Lists

No regulatory information available.

DHS Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS)

RELEASE THEFT SABOTAGE
Chemical of Interest CAS Number Min Conc STQ Security
Issue
Min Conc STQ Security
Issue
Min Conc STQ Security
Issue
Aluminum chloride, anhydrous 7446-70-0 ACG APA sabotage/ contamination

(DHS, 2007)

Alternate Chemical Names

This section provides a listing of alternate names for this chemical, including trade names and synonyms.