Add to MyChemicals Print Friendly Page
Chemical Datasheet

TELLURIUM

Chemical Identifiers | Hazards | Response Recommendations | Physical Properties | Regulatory Information | Alternate Chemical Names

Chemical Identifiers

The Chemical Identifier fields include common identification numbers, the NFPA diamond U.S. Department of Transportation hazard labels, and a general description of the chemical. The information in CAMEO Chemicals comes from a variety of data sources.
CAS Number UN/NA Number DOT Hazard Label USCG CHRIS Code
  • 13494-80-9
none data unavailable none
NIOSH Pocket Guide International Chem Safety Card
Telluriumexternal link
NFPA 704
data unavailable
General Description
Grayish-white, lustrous, brittle, crystalline solid; dark-gray to brown, amorphous powder with metallic characteristics. Used as a coloring agent in chinaware, porcelains, enamels, glass; producing black finish on silverware; semiconductor devices and research; manufacturing special alloys of marked electrical resistance. Improves mechanical properties of lead; powerful carbide stabilizer in cast iron, tellurium vapor in "daylight" lamps, vulcanization of rubber. Blasting caps. Semiconductor research. (EPA, 1998)

Hazards

The Hazard fields include special hazard alerts air and water reactions, fire hazards, health hazards, a reactivity profile, and details about reactive groups assignments and potentially incompatible absorbents. The information in CAMEO Chemicals comes from a variety of data sources.
Reactivity Alerts
Air & Water Reactions
A finely divided suspension of elemental tellurium in air will explode. Insoluble in water.
Fire Hazard
A finely divided suspension of elemental tellurium in air will explode. Burning tellurium produces toxic tellurium oxide gas. Avoid solid sodium, halogens, interhalogens, metals, hexalithium disilicide. Reacts with nitric acid; reacts with concentrated sulfuric acid forming a red solution. Dissolves in potassium hydroxide in the presence of air with formation of deep red solution; combines with halogens. Avoid antimony and chlorine trifluoride; chlorine trifluoride reacts vigorously with tellurium producing flame. Fluorine and tellurium react with incandescence. Lithium silicide attacks tellurium with incandescence. Reaction with zinc is accompanied by incandescence (same potential with cadmium, only hazard is less). A vigorous reaction results when liquid tellurium is poured over solid sodium. (EPA, 1998)
Health Hazard
Causes central nervous system depression. Moderate skin and eye irritant. Tellurium is capable of doing harm within the body by replacing the essential element sulfur. (EPA, 1998)
Reactivity Profile
TELLURIUM is attacked by chlorine fluoride with incandescence. When tellurium and potassium are warmed in an atmosphere of hydrogen, combination occurs with incandescence [Mellor 11:40. 1946-47]. Burning tellurium produces toxic tellurium oxide gas. Avoid solid sodium, halogens, interhalogens, metals, hexalithium disilicide. Reacts with nitric acid; reacts with concentrated sulfuric acid forming a red solution. Dissolves in potassium hydroxide in the presence of air with formation of deep red solution; combines with halogens. Avoid antimony and chlorine trifluoride; chlorine trifluoride reacts vigorously with tellurium producing flame. Fluorine and tellurium react with incandescence. Lithium silicide attacks tellurium with incandescence. Reaction with zinc is accompanied by incandescence (same potential with cadmium, only hazard is less). A vigorous reaction results when liquid tellurium is poured over solid sodium [EPA, 1998].
Belongs to the Following Reactive Group(s)
Potentially Incompatible Absorbents

No information available.

Response Recommendations

The Response Recommendation fields include isolation and evacuation distances, as well as recommendations for firefighting, non-fire response, protective clothing, and first aid. The information in CAMEO Chemicals comes from a variety of data sources.
Isolation and Evacuation
No information available.
Firefighting
Straight water streams will scatter molten tellurium oxide. Wear goggles, rubber gloves, and proper respirator with filter.

Use water spray. Tellurium will burn only slowly in air. (EPA, 1998)
Non-Fire Response
Caution : When heated to decomposition, toxic fumes of tellurium oxide will be emitted. Avoid sources of extreme heat.

Ventilate area of spill or leak; collect spilled material in the most convenient and safe manner and deposit in sealed containers for reclamation or for disposal in a secured sanitary landfill. Liquids containing tellurium should be absorbed in vermiculite, dry sand, earth or a similar material. (EPA, 1998)
Protective Clothing
Skin: No recommendation is made specifying the need for personal protective equipment for the body.

Eyes: No recommendation is made specifying the need for eye protection.

Wash skin: No recommendation is made specifying the need for washing the substance from the skin (either immediately or at the end of the work shift).

Remove: No recommendation is made specifying the need for removing clothing that becomes wet or contaminated.

Change: No recommendation is made specifying the need for the worker to change clothing after the work shift. (NIOSH, 2016)
DuPont Tychem® Suit Fabrics
No information available.
First Aid
Signs and Symptoms of Acute Tellurium Exposure: Signs and symptoms of acute exposure to tellurium may include drowsiness, malaise, lassitude, weakness, and dizziness. Gastrointestinal symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, anorexia, and constipation. A metallic taste, garlicky breath, and profuse sweating may be noted. Kidney damage, liver injury, and pulmonary effects may also occur. Dermal exposure may result in dermatitis (red, inflamed skin).

Emergency Life-Support Procedures: Acute exposure to tellurium may require decontamination and life support for the victims. Emergency personnel should wear protective clothing appropriate to the type and degree of contamination. Air-purifying or supplied-air respiratory equipment should also be worn, as necessary. Rescue vehicles should carry supplies such as plastic sheeting and disposable plastic bags to assist in preventing spread of contamination.

Inhalation Exposure:
1. Move victims to fresh air. Emergency personnel should avoid self-exposure to tellurium.
2. Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any trauma. If no pulse is detected, provide CPR. If not breathing, provide artificial respiration. If breathing is labored, administer oxygen or other respiratory support.
3. Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive procedures.
4. Transport to a health care facility.

Dermal/Eye Exposure:
1. Remove victims from exposure. Emergency personnel should avoid self- exposure to tellurium.
2. Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any trauma. If no pulse is detected, provide CPR. If not breathing, provide artificial respiration. If breathing is labored, administer oxygen or other respiratory support.
3. Remove contaminated clothing as soon as possible.
4. If eye exposure has occurred, eyes must be flushed with lukewarm water for at least 15 minutes.
5. Wash exposed skin areas THOROUGHLY with soap and water.
6. Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive procedures.
7. Transport to a health care facility.

Ingestion Exposure:
1. Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any trauma. If no pulse is detected, provide CPR. If not breathing, provide artificial respiration. If breathing is labored, administer oxygen or other respiratory support.
2. Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive procedures.
3. Vomiting may be induced with syrup of Ipecac. If elapsed time since ingestion of tellurium is unknown or suspected to be greater than 30 minutes, do not induce vomiting and proceed to Step
4. Ipecac should not be administered to children under 6 months of age.Warning: Syrup of Ipecac should be administered only if victims are alert, have an active gag-reflex, and show no signs of impending seizure or coma. If ANY uncertainty exists, proceed to Step
4.The following dosages of Ipecac are recommended: children up to 1 year old, 10 mL (1/3 oz); children 1 to 12 years old, 15 mL (1/2 oz); adults, 30 mL (1 oz). Ambulate (walk) the victims and give large quantities of water. If vomiting has not occurred after 15 minutes, Ipecac may be readministered. Continue to ambulate and give water to the victims. If vomiting has not occurred within 15 minutes after second administration of Ipecac, administer activated charcoal.
4. Activated charcoal may be administered if victims are conscious and alert. Use 15 to 30 g (1/2 to 1 oz) for children, 50 to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz) for adults, with 125 to 250 mL (1/2 to 1 cup) of water.
5. Promote excretion by administering a saline cathartic or sorbitol to conscious and alert victims. Children require 15 to 30 g (1/2 to 1 oz) of cathartic; 50 to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz) is recommended for adults.
6. Transport to a health care facility. (EPA, 1998)

Physical Properties

The Physical Property fields include properties such as vapor pressure and boiling point, as well as explosive limits and toxic exposure thresholds The information in CAMEO Chemicals comes from a variety of data sources.
Chemical Formula:
  • Te
Flash Point: data unavailable
Lower Explosive Limit (LEL): data unavailable
Upper Explosive Limit (UEL): data unavailable
Autoignition Temperature: data unavailable
Melting Point: 842 ° F (EPA, 1998)
Vapor Pressure: 1 mm Hg at 968 ° F (EPA, 1998)
Vapor Density (Relative to Air): data unavailable
Specific Gravity: 6.24 (EPA, 1998)
Boiling Point: 1814° F amorphous powder 2534° F crystalline solid (EPA, 1998)
Molecular Weight: 127.6 (EPA, 1998)
Water Solubility: Insoluble (NIOSH, 2016)
Ionization Potential: data unavailable
IDLH: 25 mg/m3 (as Te) (NIOSH, 2016)

AEGLs (Acute Exposure Guideline Levels)

No AEGL information available.

ERPGs (Emergency Response Planning Guidelines)

No ERPG information available.

PACs (Protective Action Criteria)

Chemical PAC-1 PAC-2 PAC-3
Tellurium (13494-80-9) 1.8 mg/m3 20 mg/m3 110 mg/m3
(DOE, 2016)

Regulatory Information

The Regulatory Information fields include information from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Title III Consolidated List of Lists, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards, and the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration's Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals Standard List (see more about these data sources).

EPA Consolidated List of Lists

No regulatory information available.

DHS Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS)

No regulatory information available.

OSHA Process Safety Management (PSM) Standard List

No regulatory information available.

Alternate Chemical Names

This section provides a listing of alternate names for this chemical, including trade names and synonyms.