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Chemical Datasheet

OZONE

2.3 - Poisonous gas
Chemical Identifiers | Hazards | Response Recommendations | Physical Properties | Regulatory Information | Alternate Chemical Names

Chemical Identifiers

The Chemical Identifier fields include common identification numbers, the NFPA diamond U.S. Department of Transportation hazard labels, and a general description of the chemical. The information in CAMEO Chemicals comes from a variety of data sources.
CAS Number UN/NA Number DOT Hazard Label USCG CHRIS Code
  • 10028-15-6   (OZONE)
  • Poison Gas
none
NIOSH Pocket Guide International Chem Safety Card
Ozoneexternal link
NFPA 704
data unavailable
General Description
A colorless to bluish gas that condenses to a dark blue liquid, or blue-black crystals. Has a characteristic odor in concentrations less than 2 ppm. Used as a disinfectant for air and water; used for bleaching waxes, textiles and oils, ozonolysis of unsaturated fatty acids to pelargonic and other acids; manufacture of ink; catalyst; water treatment for taste and odor control; mold and bacteria inhibitor in cold storage; bleaching agent. (EPA, 1998)

Hazards

The Hazard fields include special hazard alerts air and water reactions, fire hazards, health hazards, a reactivity profile, and details about reactive groups assignments and potentially incompatible absorbents. The information in CAMEO Chemicals comes from a variety of data sources.
Reactivity Alerts
Air & Water Reactions
No rapid reaction with air. No rapid reaction with water.
Fire Hazard
Severe explosion hazard when shocked, exposed to heat or flame, or by chemical reaction with organic substances, especially reducing agents. Ozone is a powerful oxidizing agent. Incompatible with alkenes; aromatic compounds; benzene, rubber; bromine; dicyanogen; diethyl ether; dinitrogen tetroxide; hydrogen bromide; 4-hydroxy-4-methyl-1,6-heptadiene; nitrogen trichloride; stibine; tetrafluorohydrazine. Avoid contact with organic materials. (EPA, 1998)
Health Hazard
Ozone is highly toxic via inhalation or by contact of liquid to skin, eyes, or mucous membranes. It is capable of causing acute to chronic lung damage, burns, and death or permanent injury. Ozone can be toxic at a concentration of 100 ppm for 1 minute. Ozone is capable of causing death from pulmonary edema. It increases sensitivity of the lungs to bronchoconstrictors and allergens, increases susceptibility to and severity of lung bacterial and viral infections. (EPA, 1998)
Reactivity Profile
OZONE is a propellant; ignites upon contact with alcohols, amines, ammonia, beryllium alkyls, boranes, dicyanogen, hydrazines, hydrocarbons, hydrogen, nitroalkanes, powdered metals, silanes, or thiols [Bretherick 1979. p.174]. Aniline in a atmosphere of ozone produces a white galatinous explosive ozobenzene [Mellor 1:911. 1946-47]. A mixture of ether and ozone forms aldehyde and acetic acid and a heavy liquid, ethyl peroxide, an explosive [Mellor 1:911. 1946-47]. Severe explosions occur attempting to form tribromic octaoxide from bromine and ozone [Mellor 2, Supp. 1:748. 1956]. Mixtures of ozone and dinitrogen pentaoxide are flammable or explosive [Mellor 8, Supp. 2:276. 1967]. Ozone and ethylene react explosively [Berichte 38:3837]. Nitrogen dioxide and ozone react with the evolution of light, and often explode [J. Chem. Phys. 18:366 1920]. Contact of very cold liquefied gas with water may result in vigorous or violent boiling of the product and extremely rapid vaporization due to the large temperature differences involved. If the water is hot, there is the possibility that a liquid "superheat" explosion may occur. Pressures may build to dangerous levels if liquid gas contacts water in a closed container, [Handling Chemicals Safely 1980].
Belongs to the Following Reactive Group(s)
Potentially Incompatible Absorbents

Use caution: Liquids with this reactive group classification have been known to react with the absorbents listed below. More info about absorbents, including situations to watch out for...

Response Recommendations

The Response Recommendation fields include isolation and evacuation distances, as well as recommendations for firefighting, non-fire response, protective clothing, and first aid. The information in CAMEO Chemicals comes from a variety of data sources.
Isolation and Evacuation
Excerpt from ERG Guide 123 [Gases - Toxic and/or Corrosive]:

As an immediate precautionary measure, isolate spill or leak area for at least 100 meters (330 feet) in all directions.

SPILL: See ERG Table 1 - Initial Isolation and Protective Action Distances on the UN/NA 1955 datasheet.

FIRE: If tank, rail car or tank truck is involved in a fire, ISOLATE for 800 meters (1/2 mile) in all directions; also, consider initial evacuation for 800 meters (1/2 mile) in all directions. (ERG, 2016)
Firefighting
In case of fire: keep cylinder cool by spraying water. (EPA, 1998)
Non-Fire Response
Isolate area and deny entry. Stay upwind; keep out of low areas. Ventilate closed spaces before entering them. Workers handling liquid ozone should wear protective equipment designed for exposure to cryogenic liquid. (EPA, 1998)
Protective Clothing
Skin: No recommendation is made specifying the need for personal protective equipment for the body.

Eyes: No recommendation is made specifying the need for eye protection.

Wash skin: No recommendation is made specifying the need for washing the substance from the skin (either immediately or at the end of the work shift).

Remove: No recommendation is made specifying the need for removing clothing that becomes wet or contaminated.

Change: No recommendation is made specifying the need for the worker to change clothing after the work shift. (NIOSH, 2016)
DuPont Tychem® Suit Fabrics
No information available.
First Aid
Warning: Effects may be delayed for 12 to 24 hours. Caution is advised.

Signs and Symptoms of Acute Ozone Exposure: Signs and symptoms of acute exposure to ozone may be severe and include irritation and burns of the skin, eyes, and mucous membranes. An increased respiratory rate, shallow breathing, cough, dyspnea (shortness of breath), bronchitis, pulmonary edema, and pulmonary hemorrhage may occur. Tachycardia (rapid heart rate) and hypotension (low blood pressure) may be observed. Neurologic effects include fatigue, dizziness, drowsiness, headache, exhiliration, and depression. Nausea, vomiting, and anorexia may occur. Eye exposure may result in conjuctivitis (red, inflamed eyes).

Emergency Life-Support Procedures: Acute exposure to ozone may require decontamination and life support for the victims. Emergency personnel should wear protective clothing appropriate to the type and degree of contamination. Air-purifying or supplied-air respiratory equipment should also be worn, as necessary. Rescue vehicles should carry supplies such as plastic sheeting and disposable plastic bags to assist in preventing spread of contamination.

Inhalation Exposure:
1. Move victims to fresh air. Emergency personnel should avoid self-exposure to ozone.
2. Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any trauma. If no pulse is detected, provide CPR. If not breathing, provide artificial respiration. If breathing is labored, administer oxygen or other respiratory support.
3. Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive procedures.
4. Transport to a health care facility.

Dermal/Eye Exposure:
1. Remove victims from exposure. Emergency personnel should avoid self- exposure to ozone.
2. Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any trauma. If no pulse is detected, provide CPR. If not breathing, provide artificial respiration. If breathing is labored, administer oxygen or other respiratory support.
3. Remove contaminated clothing as soon as possible.
4. If eye exposure has occurred, eyes must be flushed with lukewarm water for at least 15 minutes.
5. THOROUGHLY wash exposed skin areas with soap and water.
6. Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive procedures.
7. Transport to a health care facility.

Ingestion Exposure: No information is available. (EPA, 1998)

Physical Properties

The Physical Property fields include properties such as vapor pressure and boiling point, as well as explosive limits and toxic exposure thresholds The information in CAMEO Chemicals comes from a variety of data sources.
Chemical Formula:
  • O3
Flash Point: data unavailable
Lower Explosive Limit (LEL): data unavailable
Upper Explosive Limit (UEL): data unavailable
Autoignition Temperature: data unavailable
Melting Point: -314 ° F (EPA, 1998)
Vapor Pressure: 41257 mm Hg at 10.4 ° F (EPA, 1998)
Vapor Density (Relative to Air): 1.7 (EPA, 1998)
Specific Gravity: 1.614 at -319.7 ° F (NTP, 1992)
Boiling Point: -169.6 ° F at 760 mm Hg (EPA, 1998)
Molecular Weight: 48 (EPA, 1998)
Water Solubility: 3e-05 g/100 g at 68┬░ F (NTP, 1992)
Ionization Potential: 12.52 eV (NIOSH, 2016)
IDLH: 5 ppm (NIOSH, 2016)

AEGLs (Acute Exposure Guideline Levels)

No AEGL information available.

ERPGs (Emergency Response Planning Guidelines)

No ERPG information available.

PACs (Protective Action Criteria)

Chemical PAC-1 PAC-2 PAC-3
Ozone (10028-15-6) 0.24 ppm 1 ppm 10 ppm
(DOE, 2016)

Regulatory Information

The Regulatory Information fields include information from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Title III Consolidated List of Lists, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards, and the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration's Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals Standard List (see more about these data sources).

EPA Consolidated List of Lists

Regulatory Name CAS Number/
313 Category Code
EPCRA 302
EHS TPQ
EPCRA 304
EHS RQ
CERCLA RQ EPCRA 313
TRI
RCRA
Code
CAA 112(r)
RMP TQ
Ozone 10028-15-6 100 pounds 100 pounds 313

(EPA List of Lists, 2015)

DHS Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS)

No regulatory information available.

OSHA Process Safety Management (PSM) Standard List

Chemical Name CAS Number Threshold Quantity (TQ)
Ozone 10028-15-6 100 pounds

(OSHA, 2011)

Alternate Chemical Names

This section provides a listing of alternate names for this chemical, including trade names and synonyms.