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Chemical Datasheet

ANTIMONY PENTAFLUORIDE

8 - Corrosive 6.1 - Poison
Chemical Identifiers | Hazards | Response Recommendations | Physical Properties | Regulatory Information | Alternate Chemical Names

Chemical Identifiers

The Chemical Identifier fields include common identification numbers, the NFPA diamond, U.S. Department of Transportation hazard labels, and a general description of the chemical. The information in CAMEO Chemicals comes from a variety of data sources.
CAS Number UN/NA Number DOT Hazard Label USCG CHRIS Code
  • 7783-70-2   (ANTIMONY PENTAFLUORIDE)
  • Corrosive
  • Poison
NIOSH Pocket Guide International Chem Safety Card
Antimonyexternal link
NFPA 704
Diamond Hazard Value Description
0
4 1
Blue Health 4 Can be lethal.
Red Flammability 0 Will not burn under typical fire conditions.
Yellow Instability 1 Normally stable but can become unstable at elevated temperatures and pressures.
White Special
(NFPA, 2010)
General Description
A colorless, oily liquid. Fumes irritate the eyes and mucous membranes. Toxic. Corrosive to metals and tissue. Extremely dangerous to tissue; its burns may be followed by gangrene. Only shipped in cylinders. Under prolonged exposure to heat cylinders may violently rupture and rocket. Used to make other chemicals as well as a catalyst in the manufacture of other chemicals.

Hazards

The Hazard fields include special hazard alerts, air and water reactions, fire hazards, health hazards, a reactivity profile, and details about reactive groups assignments and potentially incompatible absorbents. The information in CAMEO Chemicals comes from a variety of data sources.
Reactivity Alerts
Air & Water Reactions
Fumes in air to form small amounts of hydrogen fluoride (reacts with moisture in air). May React with water to give hydrofluoric acid (HF) [Merck 11th ed. 1989]. Based on a scenario where the chemical is spilled into an excess of water (at least 5 fold excess of water), half of the maximum theoretical yield of Hydrogen Fluoride gas will be created in 1.2 minutes. Experimental details are in the following: "Development of the Table of Initial Isolation and Protective Distances for the 2008 Emergency Response Guidebook", ANL/DIS-09-2, D.F. Brown, H.M. Hartmann, W.A. Freeman, and W.D. Haney, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, June 2009.
Fire Hazard
Reacts violently with water, to form poisonous hydrogen fluoride fumes. If confined and wet can cause explosion. May cause fire in contact with combustible material. Hazardous polymerization may not occur. (EPA, 1998)
Health Hazard
The compound is irritating to eyes, skin, and lungs. Contact with eyes or skin causes severe burns. The compound is extremely toxic with a probable oral lethal dose of 5-50 mg/kg or between 7 drops and one teaspoonful for a 150 pound person (antimony salts). (EPA, 1998)
Reactivity Profile
ANTIMONY PENTAFLUORIDE is strongly acidic. Reacts vigorously with bases. When heated to decomposition, it emits highly toxic fumes of fluorides and metallic antimony. Reacts with ammonia to form a diammoniate.
Belongs to the Following Reactive Group(s)
Potentially Incompatible Absorbents

Use caution: Liquids with this reactive group classification have been known to react with the absorbents listed below. More info about absorbents, including situations to watch out for...

Response Recommendations

The Response Recommendation fields include isolation and evacuation distances, as well as recommendations for firefighting, non-fire response, protective clothing, and first aid. The information in CAMEO Chemicals comes from a variety of data sources.
Isolation and Evacuation
Excerpt from ERG Guide 157 [Substances - Toxic and/or Corrosive (Non-Combustible / Water-Sensitive)]:

As an immediate precautionary measure, isolate spill or leak area in all directions for at least 50 meters (150 feet) for liquids and at least 25 meters (75 feet) for solids.

SPILL: See ERG Table 1 - Initial Isolation and Protective Action Distances on the UN/NA 1732 datasheet.

FIRE: If tank, rail car or tank truck is involved in a fire, ISOLATE for 800 meters (1/2 mile) in all directions; also, consider initial evacuation for 800 meters (1/2 mile) in all directions. (ERG, 2016)
Firefighting
Wear full protective clothing and acid-gas-type canister mask. Move container from fire area. Spray cooling water on containers that are exposed to flames until well after fire is out. Reacts violently with water.

Do not use water or foam on fire or on adjacent fires; extinguish with dry chemicals or carbon dioxide. (EPA, 1998)
Non-Fire Response
Excerpt from ERG Guide 157 [Substances - Toxic and/or Corrosive (Non-Combustible / Water-Sensitive)]:

ELIMINATE all ignition sources (no smoking, flares, sparks or flames in immediate area). All equipment used when handling the product must be grounded. Do not touch damaged containers or spilled material unless wearing appropriate protective clothing. Stop leak if you can do it without risk. A vapor-suppressing foam may be used to reduce vapors. DO NOT GET WATER INSIDE CONTAINERS. Use water spray to reduce vapors or divert vapor cloud drift. Avoid allowing water runoff to contact spilled material. Prevent entry into waterways, sewers, basements or confined areas.

SMALL SPILL: Cover with DRY earth, DRY sand or other non-combustible material followed with plastic sheet to minimize spreading or contact with rain. Use clean, non-sparking tools to collect material and place it into loosely covered plastic containers for later disposal. (ERG, 2016)
Protective Clothing
For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand, full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure- demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating, chemical resistant suit. (EPA, 1998)
DuPont Tychem® Suit Fabrics
No information available.
First Aid
Warning: Antimony Pentafluoride is highly corrosive to the eyes, skin, and lungs, and is extremely toxic if swallowed. The estimated lethal dose after ingestion is between 7 drops and one teaspoonful for a 150 pound person.

Signs and Symptoms of Antimony Pentafluoride Exposure: Acute exposure to antimony pentafluoride may result in severe eye damage, vomiting, and severe burns of mouth and throat. Over- exposure by any route can cause bloody stools, slow pulse rate, low blood pressure, coma, convulsions, and cardiac arrest.

Emergency Life-Support Procedures: Acute exposure to antimony pentafluoride may require decontamination and life support for the victims. Emergency personnel should wear protective clothing appropriate to the type and degree of contamination. Air-purifying or supplied-air respiratory equipment should also be worn, as necessary. Rescue vehicles should carry supplies such as plastic sheeting and disposable plastic bags to assist in preventing spread of contamination.

Inhalation Exposure:
1. Move victims to fresh air. Emergency personnel should avoid self-exposure to antimony pentafluoride.
2. Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any trauma. If no pulse is detected, provide CPR. If not breathing, provide artificial respiration. If breathing is labored, administer 100% humidified oxygen or other respiratory support.
3. Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive procedures.
4. Rush to a health care facility.

Dermal/Eye Exposure:
1. Remove victims from exposure. Emergency personnel should avoid self-exposure to antimony pentafluoride.
2. Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any trauma. If no pulse is detected, provide CPR. If not breathing, provide artificial respiration. If breathing is labored, administer 100% humidified oxygen or other respiratory support.
3. Remove contaminated clothing as soon as possible.
4. If eye exposure has occurred, eyes must be flushed with lukewarm water for at least 15 minutes.
5. Wash exposed skin areas thoroughly with soap and water.
6. Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive procedures.
7. Rush to a health care facility.

Ingestion Exposure:
1. Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any trauma. If no pulse is detected, provide CPR. If not breathing, provide artificial respiration. If breathing is labored, administer 100% humidified oxygen or other respiratory support.
2. DO NOT induce vomiting or attempt to neutralize.
3. Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive procedures.
4. Give the victims water or milk: children up to 1 year old, 125 mL (4 oz or 1/2 cup); children 1 to 12 years old, 200 mL (6 ox or 3/4 cup); adults, 250 mL (8 oz or 1 cup). Water or milk should be given only if victims are conscious and alert.
5. Rush to a health care facility. (EPA, 1998)

Physical Properties

The Physical Property fields include properties such as vapor pressure and boiling point, as well as explosive limits and toxic exposure thresholds. The information in CAMEO Chemicals comes from a variety of data sources.
Chemical Formula:
  • SbF5
Flash Point: data unavailable
Lower Explosive Limit (LEL): Not flammable. (EPA, 1998)
Upper Explosive Limit (UEL): Not flammable. (EPA, 1998)
Autoignition Temperature: data unavailable
Melting Point: 47 ° F (EPA, 1998)
Vapor Pressure: data unavailable
Vapor Density (Relative to Air): data unavailable
Specific Gravity: 3.097 at 78.44 ° F (EPA, 1998)
Boiling Point: 286 ° F at 760 mm Hg (EPA, 1998)
Molecular Weight: 216.76 (EPA, 1998)
Water Solubility: data unavailable
Ionization Potential: data unavailable
IDLH: 50 mg/m3 (as Sb) (NIOSH, 2016)

AEGLs (Acute Exposure Guideline Levels)

No AEGL information available.

ERPGs (Emergency Response Planning Guidelines)

No ERPG information available.

PACs (Protective Action Criteria)

Chemical PAC-1 PAC-2 PAC-3
Antimony pentafluoride (7783-70-2) 2.7 mg/m3 23 mg/m3 140 mg/m3
(DOE, 2016)

Regulatory Information

The Regulatory Information fields include information from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Title III Consolidated List of Lists, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards, and the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration's Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals Standard List (see more about these data sources).

EPA Consolidated List of Lists

Regulatory Name CAS Number/
313 Category Code
EPCRA 302
EHS TPQ
EPCRA 304
EHS RQ
CERCLA RQ EPCRA 313
TRI
RCRA
Code
CAA 112(r)
RMP TQ
Antimony Compounds N010 & 313
Antimony pentafluoride 7783-70-2 500 pounds 500 pounds 313c

(EPA List of Lists, 2015)

DHS Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS)

RELEASE THEFT SABOTAGE
Chemical of Interest CAS Number Min Conc STQ Security
Issue
Min Conc STQ Security
Issue
Min Conc STQ Security
Issue
Antimony pentafluoride 7783-70-2 ACG APA sabotage/ contamination

(DHS, 2007)

OSHA Process Safety Management (PSM) Standard List

No regulatory information available.

Alternate Chemical Names

This section provides a listing of alternate names for this chemical, including trade names and synonyms.